Environmental Affairs Advisory Committee (EAAC)

Meeting: 4th Tuesday, 7:00pm, Cranberry Hall (located behind the Municipal Building at 17 North Main Street)

The purpose of this Committee is to research into the use and possible use of the open land areas of the Township, maintain an index of all open areas, publicly or privately owned, review site plans of proposed development in regards to open space, consider and make recommendations to Council on other environmental and sustainability issues; as well as the selection, planting, care, culture, trimming and development of shade trees in the Township. 

Click HERE for the EAAC's list of Goals & Objectives for 2017. 

Click HERE for the Council Resolution and supporting documents for Medford's inclusion in the Sustainable New Jersey Program. 

Click HERE for the Open Space & Farmland page on our website.

Check out the new Hartford Trails Facebook page for info & updates on new biking & walking trails being constructed in Hartford Crossings Park, Hartford &Church Roads. https://www.facebook.com/groups/351915271572374/ 

Meetings

All regular and special meetings of the Committee shall be open to the public. Please check this website for any potential cancellations or changes.  

Agendas

January 24, 2017
February 28, 2017
March 28, 2017 
April 25, 2017 (Meeting Cancelled due to lack of quorum)
May 23, 2017
June 27, 2017
July 25, 2017 
August 22, 2017
September 26, 2017
October 24, 2017
November 28, 2017
December 2017 - TBA

Minutes

January 2017 Meeting
February 2017 Meeting 
March 2017 Meeting
April 2017 (No Meeting)
May 2017 Meeting
June 2017 Meeting
July 2017 Meeting 
August 2017 Meeting




Contact the EAAC

Please contact the EAAC by emailing EAAC@medfordtownship.com.  You may also call (609) 654-2608 x324.  

2017 Committee Members

Matthew Keane, Chairperson
Megan Burke
Paul Celia
Bruce Ebbeson
Deborah Evans
Charles "Chip" Germain
Andrea Kornick
Jennifer Warholak
Maria Yates
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MEDFORD COMPANY CREATES WEBSITE TO HELP CREATE ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY YARDS 

New Jersey has its Jersey Fresh campaign promoting fruits and vegetables grown locally in farm fields and garden, but now the state is collaborating with a college and an environmental group to make yards more Jersey friendly.

This partnership has launched an interactive website — www.jerseyyards.org — as part of a new Jersey-Friendly Yards campaign.

The website offers practical ways for homeowners and other landowners to landscape their properties in an environmentally friendly way that will reduce stormwater runoff, capture rainwater, eliminate use of fertilizer and pesticide and replace invasive plant with native species.
State environmental officials said the ultimate goal of this campaign, however, is not to just promote native plants but to reduce stormwater runoff that contaminates rivers and streams from lawns treated with fertilizer and pesticides.
The interactive section of the site has a tool for layout for low-impact landscaping options the user can explore for different types of gardens or lawns and to reduce runoff and capture rainwater. It shows how to transform a grass-dominated property into one that has native plants and other features.
The website has an extensive plant database that suggests which native species to use instead of foreign plants that tend to overtake gardens or fields. 
The online site was built by a Medford company, Fusionspark, Inc., with input from the collaborating agencies.
Read more here: 
http://southjerseylocalnews.com/articles/2016/01/04/news/doc568ae8d4d2351853902477.txt  
http://www.courierpostonline.com/story/news/2015/12/24/making-yards-jersey-friendly-water-plants/77838694/

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What are retention basins and why do we need them? Also called wet ponds or detention basins. These are man-made/artificial lakes or ponds that include plants around the body of water. These basins serve an important function in municipalities such as Medford with high water tables by preventing flooding by channeling rain/storm water into the storage basin via the system of storm drains found on roadways and other strategic locations.   Additionally, the basins aid in storm water runoff, or water from storms that collects in the streets.  By having this water diverted to the basins, the Township is able to save money by not treating this water at the sewer treatment plant.  The basins also help in the prevention of erosion, which is a benefit for our environment. The basins greatly improve water quality in the area by filtering out any pollution and toxins from the storm water, again, reducing costs to the total water treatment process.

In ecologically sensitive areas such as Medford, it is preferable to use certain plants in basins as opposed to only grass. Plants in retention basins aid in the filtration of the water within the basin. The preferable types of plants used for the basins are wetland and native plants in the area. In New Jersey, some plants used in these basins are yellow pond lily, pickerel weed, shrub dogwood, and stagger bush. These plants are providing much-needed help in keeping our pollinators like bees and butterflies around and happy.  The Township can also save tax dollars by allowing these basins to grow the native plants instead of weekly or monthly mowing by Township staff.

There's a new publication by the NRCS on native meadow planting entitled "A Guide to Conservation Plantings on Critical Areas for the Northeast."  This is pretty detailed with lots of great info to plant a basin.  http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_PLANTMATERIALS/publications/nypmspu11417.pdf   

The Xerces Society is another resource to plant basins: http://www.xerces.org/pollinators-northeast-region

Link to the Pollinator Habitat workshop to be held on September 29th
http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecyy3jpp795b8094&llr=tnjebhdab

 

Leaf pick up. Medford is one of the two municipalities in New Jersey with the longest tenure of earning the distinction as “Tree City, USA”  towns – we live in and next to the famous federally designated Pinelands Natural Preserve; aka the “Pine Barrens.” We have a LOT of leaves, but rather than dreading fall and enjoying the splendor of their rich colors, make good use of them!! Do not clear out your leaves from forested areas - leaves provide ground cover for our wildlife friends, can be used as mulch, protect plants and shrubs in the cold winter months, provide nutritious compost for your trees and plants and make a great fertilizer for your lawn. Use your lawn mower to mulch the fallen leaves back into your lawn as  you mow. These leaves (and grass clippings) provide essential nutrients to the grass and yard season after season.  Another alternative is to create a leaf compost. Leaf composting involves placing all the collective leaves in one area, turning them over once in a while so the leaves naturally degrade over time, creating a rich compost to use in your garden. By using your leaves in an environmentally conscious way, not only are you nurturing our Tree City's environment, you are helping yourself and fellow neighbors by saving the tens of thousands of your tax dollars each season spent on leaf collection.  In the fall of 2015,  Medford collected over _____________ cubic yards of leaves and disposed of them at a cost of over $311,500, which is equal to a penny on the tax rate!!  

Click here for a NJDEP Press Release for the Proper Use of Pesticides & Fertilizers 

Click here for a NJDEP Press Release for Deer Alerts 

Click here for a NJDEP Press Release for wood-burning safety tips

Click here for the Pinelands Commission Request for Public Comments on its Conservation Fund

Click here for a link to the ARBOR DAY FOUNDATION, which is full of information on tree planting and care of community trees and forested areas.  

 

  • Municipal Center Address: 17 North Main Street, Medford, NJ 08055
  • Phone: (609) 654-2608
  • Fax: (609) 953-4087
  • Hours: 8:30 am - 4:30pm